Lockout / Tagout
Machine energy can be lethal if not controlled. OSC can help by training your people, developing machine-specific procedures and conducting annual audits, all of which are required by law.
Control of Hazardous Energy Program
A lockout/tagout written program is designed to establish and explain your required practices and policy on zero mechanical state. Primarily intended for workers, the program explains the seriousness of machine energy and sets rules for the use of locks and tags.
Machine-Specific Energy Control Procedures
The maintenance of industrial and construction machinery is a leading cause of workplace accidents and injuries. Whether a machine is operating or not, its internal energy poses a serious threat of producing hazardous force. To avoid the threat of force during maintenance the energy must be removed. Inadequate hazardous energy control procedures can be fatal.
Sources of energy for machines include electricity, air (pneumatic), water and oil (hydraulic) pressure, steam, chemical, thermal and the force of gravity (mechanical). Energy (mechanical) can be stored in machines by jams, springs, capacitors, coasting (spinning) motors and hammers.
Sources of energy for machines include electricity, air (pneumatic), water and oil (hydraulic) pressure, steam, chemical, thermal and the force of gravity (mechanical). Energy (mechanical) can be stored in machines by jams, springs, capacitors, coasting (spinning) motors and hammers.
Methods of removing energy from a machine include turning off electricity at the control panel and at local or main electrical disconnects, assuring stored electricity is dissipated, shutting off sources of air and hydraulic pressure and draining tanks and hoses, allowing equipment to cool, and physically blocking or supporting moving parts that be actuated by stored energy.
OSC personnel are trained to analyze machines in order to identify all sources of energy, potential hazards and methods to safely turn off the energy.
During our field work, we look for every source of energy for each machine and how to turn off those sources when the machine needs maintenance.
Your LOTO procedures report identifies each energy source and its control mechanism. The report describes for maintenance personnel each source, the specific step to take to de-energize it, accompanied by its photograph and then how to lock or tag the power source so no one else will inadvertently turn it back on.
Your LOTO procedures report identifies each energy source and its control mechanism. The report describes for maintenance personnel each source, the specific step to take to de-energize it, accompanied by its photograph and then how to lock or tag the power source so no one else will inadvertently turn it back on.
Most companies attach our laminated procedures to the machines to constantly remind users how to avoid energy hazards.
Training
Lockout/tagout training is conducted on your site. The objective is for each employee, authorized or affected, to understand his or her role and responsibility.
Management and workers must understand and appreciate the hazards, and potential personal and company costs, of inadequate energy control procedures. Training must be conducted to inform everyone of the proper methods of minimizing risks while maintaining equipment. Reporting stories of the consequences of failing to use lockout/tagout helps people remember to follow your requirements. 
Annual Inspection
OSHA requires an annual inspection of your energy control procedures at least annually to ensure compliance with the OSHA standard and workers are following the procedures. OSC can conduct this inspection and review with each employee his or her responsibilities. Procedures will be updated if necessary due to changes in equipment or processes. OSC will provide required certification. 
The employer shall certify that the periodic inspections have been performed. The certification shall identify the machine or equipment on which the energy control procedure was being utilized, the date of the inspection, the employees included in the inspection, and the person performing the inspection.
Lockout
Once the sources of energy and force has been disconnected and drained from the machine, each disconnection point is physically locked (Lockout). There are many methods of locking a connection point. Padlocks and mechanical pins inserted in part supports (gravity) are commonly used.
Tagout
Even though a source of energy may be locked or pinned, it is possible that another worker will unlock it. To assure this should not happen, a tag is attached to the lock (Tagout). The tag, usually a small colorful plastic card, alerts everyone that the lock is to protect a worker performing maintenance.
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